><
1/5

24 June - 3 July, 2016

 

Maurizio Bongiovanni

Enotria Crescenzi 

Sofia Dahlgren

Roberto Ekholm

Oliver Hickmet  

Josep Maynou

Nat Tafelmacher-Magnat

Thomas Zipp

 

Curated by Roberto Ekholm | EKCO

HilbertRaum

Reuterstr. 31
12047 Berlin

www.hilbert-raum.com

Link To E-Catalogue

Hmmmmmmmmm

 

The title expresses, in onomatopoeia, the undefined buzzing sound from both electrical equipment and meditative chanting. In the midst of buzzing smart phones, tablets and an increasingly digitized and high-speed society, the search for inner peace and healing become the way to survive urban life. Healing holidays are the new travel experience, searching for deeper meaning and a quasi-cultural exchange of spiritualties. Shamans, organic cocktails and pseudo-scientific medicines grace the front covers of travel magazines.

 

Expressed through art, this exhibition is a reflection of the collective unconscious (C.Jung) and how archetypes are changing with the shifting awareness in society. The archetypes, for example digitised material or food can both be destructive or healing. They can become a vehicle or tool for spiritual growth.  The show picks up on the current social changes and attitudes towards health and shows a change in the manifestations of the archetypes.

 

In this group show, the works themselves are created in cultural exchanges between Berlin and abroad. An internal exchange between performative photography, traditional Moroccan rug making as image-making, exercise materiality as landscaping, healing medicine as sculptural concepts, emotional rants, healing bodies, and psycho-physical concepts through paintings and documentations.

 

These artists make a type of art that speaks to audiences' everyday experience at first, and then pushes it to become culturally fluid. They explore ambiguities in gender identity by exploring the healing process of their wounded bodies. A work reminding the audience of how our bodies are being forgotten, and not fully lived: through non-stop work, life-long illness and the information age. And yet, these very new forms of materiality and information processing opens up new ways of connecting to some deeper meaning.